Grange (@1.62) vs Shane O'Neills (@2.63)
06-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Grange will win

Grange – Shane O'Neills Match Prediction | 06-10-2019 11:00

Elizabeth was less concerned with the respective claims of Shane O'Neill and the Baron of Dungannon, the former resting on Gaelic law, the latter on an English patent, than with the question of policy involved. Characteristically, she temporised; but fearing that Shane could become a tool of Spanish intriguers, she permitted him to return to Ireland, recognising him as The O'Neill.

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Shane was born in or just before 1530, to Conn Bacach O'Neill, chief of the O'Neills of Tyrone, and Sorcha O'Neill, daughter of Hugh Oge O'Neill, chief of the O'Neills of Clandeboye.[3] Shane's mother died while he was very young and Shane, following Gaelic custom, was fostered by the O'Donnelly family, who raised him until adulthood.

Grange GFC

(1911). Encyclopdia Britannica (11th ed.). This articleincorporates text from a publication now in the public domain:Chisholm, Hugh, ed. "O'Neill".

He allied himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants. Shane, however, refused to put himself in the power of Sussex without a guarantee for his safety; and his claims were so exacting that Elizabeth determined to restore Brian. An attempt to incite the ODonnells against him, however, was frustrated. Shane, the eldest legitimate son of Conn ONeill, was a chieftain whose support the English considered worth gaining; but he rejected overtures from the Earl of Sussex, the lord deputy, and refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim. Nevertheless, Queen Elizabeth I of England was disposed to come to terms with Shane, who after his fathers death was de facto chief of the ONeill clan. She recognized his claims to the chieftainship, thus throwing over a kinsman, Brian ONeill.

Elizabeth, whose prudence and parsimony were averse to so formidable an undertaking as the complete subjugation of the powerful O'Neill, desired peace with him at almost any price. An attempt by Sussex to increase the enmity of the O'Donnells against the O'Neill was frustrated by his seizure of Calvagh O'Donnell in a monastery. Elizabeth's faith in Sussex's aggressive strategy diminished when the repeated annual devastations of O'Neill's territory by the Lord Deputy with sizeable and expensive armies failed to bring him to submission.

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Catherine and her children had accompanied the O'Neill and his entourage to the MacDonnell camp at Castle Cara below Ballyterrim, and after his assassination they fled across the river Bann to the forest of Glenconkeyne, where they were protected by a lord of the Clandeboye O'Neills. Catherine made her way to safety at Duart Castle, where her brother fostered the youngest of Shane's children, those who had been born to his sister, while offering protection to the other MacShanes. The O'Shane was, however, still married to Catherine on 2 June 1567, the day of his assassination at Castle Cara, Cushendun, at the hands of a MacDonnell group with whom he was negotiating possible military aid.

Shane O'Neill (Irish: Sen Mac Cuinn Nill; c. This brought him into conflict with competing branches of the O'Neill family and with the English government in Ireland, who recognised a rival claim. Shanes's support was considered worth gaining by the English even during the lifetime of his father Conn O'Neill, 1st Earl of Tyrone (died 1559). 1530 2 June 1567), was an Irish chieftain of the O'Neill dynasty of Ulster in the mid 16th century. Shane O'Neill's career was marked by his ambition to be The O'Neill sovereign of the dominant O'Neill family of Tr Eoghainand thus overlord of the entire province. But rejecting overtures from Thomas Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Sussex, the lord deputy from 1556, Shane refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim, allying himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants.

Piers travelled to Cushendun to take Shane's head and send it to Dublin Castle. The English Government tried to pass this off as a "drunken brawl" turned savage. His body was possibly later moved to Glenarm Abbey. Here, on 2 June 1567, he was killed by the MacDonnells, and his headless body was buried at Crosskern Church at Ballyterrim above Cushendun. Unbeknownst to Shane, The Scots had already come to an agreement with Henry Sidney and William Piers, Seneschal of Clandeboye, commander of the English garrison at Carrickfergus. Attended by a small body of gallowglass, and taking his prisoner Sorley Boy with him, he presented himself among the MacDonnells near Cushendun, on the Antrim coast, hoping to propose an alliance. Failing in an attempt to arrange terms, and also in obtaining the help which he solicited from France, the O'Neill was utterly routed by the O'Donnells again at the battle of Farsetmore near Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.

During this visit Shane's legal claim to his father Conn Bacach's earldom was verbally confirmed and Shane was led to believe that he would be recognised as the 2nd Earl of Tyrone, though some reservation was made of the possible future rights of Hugh O'Neill, who had succeeded his brother Brian as Baron of Dungannon. However, confirmation of the grant of the earldom was never delivered, and the O'Neill was compelled to defend his hegemony in Ulster when his onetime supporter Sir Henry Sidney was appointed Lord Deputy and resurrected Sussex's policy of undermining the O'Neill's authority. Brian had been killed in a skirmish in April 1562 by Shane's Tanaiste, Turlough Luineach O'Neill.

The O'Neill ravaged the Pale, failed in an attempt on Dundalk, made a truce with the MacDonnells, and sought help from the Earl of Desmond. The English invaded Donegal and restored O'Donnell. This victory greatly strengthened Shane O'Neill's position, and Sir Henry Sidney, who became lord deputy in 1565, declared to the earl of Leicester that "Lucifer himself was not more puffed up with pride and ambition than O'Neill".

There, by premeditated treachery or in a sudden brawl, he was slain by the MacDonnells. The English invaded Donegal and restored ODonnell. This victory strengthened Shane ONeills position, but the English made preparations for his subjugation. Attended by a small body of retainers and taking his prisoner Sorley Boy with him, he presented himself among the MacDonnells near Cushendun, on the Antrim coast. Shane then turned his hand against the MacDonnells, claiming that he was serving the Queen of England in harrying the Scots. He fought an indecisive battle with Sorley Boy MacDonnell near Coleraine in 1564, and in 1565 he routed the MacDonnells and took Sorley Boy prisoner near Ballycastle. ONeill was routed by the ODonnells at Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.